Blocking with Wires

My Intro to Beading

I have been talking a lot about beading and knitting, learning beading to incorporate with knitting, but I haven’t shown you anything yet. I think my Intro to Beading stage may last a while, here is my first report!

You may recall that I took Laura Nelkin’s introduction to beading as one of my classes at the Vogue Knitting Live event in NYC in January. She taught us the basics of (1) putting the beads onto the yarn and sliding them into stitches purlwise and knitwise and in placement on which “leg” of the stitch and (2) adding a bead onto a stitch without adding them all to the yarn first.

My Intro to Beading
Laura Nelkin Butin Collar Kit

From there, I bought her Butin collar kit, but was unhappy with my results. I had trouble with the cast on and thus ran out of working yarn, and it turned out that the color combination I chose (“Montane”) tended to look dingy.

Not deterred, I decided to play off her design and use it to play around with other beads and colors. I used two strands of crochet string – yellow and white – with the same color beads and a silver rose bead at the base. I drew out the design and strung the beads onto the threads.

My Intro to Beading
Beaded Design
My Intro to Beading
Stringing the Beads

Casting on was difficult because the pattern uses the backward loop cast on, which I find makes the stitches really tight.  I got around this by using two needles together. You can see that each stitch is two strands. I use a marker every 10 stitches so that it’s easier to not lose (or add!) any stitches.

I followed my pattern and then had some more fun with the clasp.  I decided to put some beads in the stitches that attached the clasp.   The hardest part was making sure that I was attaching the two pieces in the right direction on each side! I am happy to report I (concentrated, paid attention and) didn’t make any mistakes and only had to sew on the clasp once!

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I used the blocking wires I bought at the Vogue Knitting Live Marketplace in January. These are long bendable wires that are woven in the knitted piece and then pinned down for blocking.  They worked really well and helped maintain the curve of the necklace.

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And the final product!

My Intro to Beading

My Intro to Beading

  
April 2015 Reading

April 2015 Reading

It got to a point that I would not allow myself to read any beading books before bedtime. Worse than electronic interaction where people do not watch TV at bedtime, the beading books got my mind whirring so swiftly that I could not sleep.  Or I would finally get myself to sleep and then I would wake up two hours later to jot down ideas.

It’s nice to be obsessed!  Oh my, another stash opportunity! With beads being so less expensive than skeins of yarn, it is a frightening thought! I. Must. Contain. Myself. at least until I have a direction. Which I Am Working Toward.
Shop Interweave Store
Thus said, you may not be surprised with the April Books Purchased Assortment. “Damn Interweave Press!”  They had some April 15th sales going on, and as you may recall from the Holiday season, I find their sales very hard to resist.

Books Bought

TitleAuthor
Getting Started with Seed BeadsDustin Wedekind
Beadwork, June/July 2014Magazine
Beadwork, August/September 2012Magazine
Mastering Beadwork A Comprehensive Guide to Off-Loom TechniquesCarol Cypher
Beaded Allure Kelly Wiese
The Beader's BibleDorothy Wood
PlainsongKent Haruf
Eggs for BreakfastDonna Leahy
Farmstead Feast: WinterAnna Hess
Miss Hazel and the Rosa Parks LeagueJonathan Odell
StolenSusan Lewis

My mother told me about an email service called Book Bub, where you get daily emails about book bargains for your e-book provider.  Stolen is the first that I found and bought from this source.  I’ve never heard of the author, Susan Lewis, though I now see that she is very prolific.

Books Read

TitleAuthorRating
Getting Started with Seed BeadsDustin WedekindDisappointing
Beadwork, June/July 2014MagazineGood
Beadwork, August/September 2012MagazineGood
Mastering Beadwork A Comprehensive Guide to Off-Loom TechniquesCarol CypherGood
Beaded Allure Kelly WieseGood
PlainsongKent HarufGood
Eggs for BreakfastDonna LeahyOkay
Miss Hazel and the Rosa Parks LeagueJonathan OdellStill reading
The Storied Life of A.J. FikryGabrielle ZevinLoved it!
The After LifeGigi Levangie GrazerJust Terrible
Girls in White DressesJennifer CloseCould not get into it at all
The Book of TomorrowCecilia AhernTwo stars
When the World was YoungElizabeth GaffneyDid not get through it.
The Mathematician's ShivaStuart RojstazerStill Reading...

I enjoyed Plainsong by Kent Haruf.  Amazon has placed it in a category which I feel is an oxymoron – Vintage Contemporary.  (What is that? Like wearing a 1980’s dress?  It’s still vintage, worn by a contemporary. But I digress.)  This is a story about a pregnant teenager who is taken in by two older bachelor brothers.  I love stories about relationships, and this one abounds with people and how they interact with each other.  At one point, where the girl goes off with the boy who impregnated her, I had to put the book down because I didn’t want to read about the brothers’ reaction of what I expected to be disappointment and confusion.  It really is a lovely book.

I have The Mathematician’s Shiva in paperback next to my favorite chair in the living room. I pick it up sporadically and am slowly wending my way through it.  It’s good enough for me to keep picking it up and returning to it, but it hasn’t drawn me in to think about it all day and rush to get home to see what happens next.

I thoroughly enjoyed our Book Club Selection, The Storied Life of A.J. Fikry by Gabrielle Zevin.  Our discussion was relatively short because we all loved it. There were no heated discussions of what was unbelievable or boring, or disengaging.  We understood the characters, they were believable, and we were all in agreement that it was a good book. While I like good books, I was disappointed (for many reasons) that the conversation veered to a discussion about many of the book club members’ pet dogs.

The Storied Life set such a high standard that it was difficult to find another book on its heels.  I tossed multiple library books, then finally got through Cecilia Ahern’s The Book of Tomorrow, a very contrived story about a girl who finds a book that has diary entries for the next day.  Admittedly, the author uses the first chapter to tell the reader to suspend reality but even so it wasn’t that great, and initially I thought I may have read it before until I realized that I was getting it confused with JoJo Moye’s Me Before You because there’s a castle in each story!  When I finished it, I gave it two stars on Amazon.  That meant “well, there must have been something there because I finished it, but I wouldn’t recommend it to anyone.”

BeadRoom.com
 

  

Where Have I Been?

I feel like it’s been ages since I posted, and even I’m wondering Where Have I Been?!

Where Have I Been?

Well, I’ve succumbed to the Beading Bug, and am trying the art of beading in order to create some new knitting.  I have bought / read a slew of beading materials and have been learning basic beading as a means to enhance my knitting.  I want to go beyond what’s out there and my mind is swirling with possibilities to test.

I’m only posting a few pictures today to show you my first trial of knitting with beads that I learned in my class at VKL this past January.

I had bought this sparkly yarn from Holiday Yarns at the VKL Marketplace and have knitted and ripped and tried different patterns out. I bought some beads and completed a (self-designed) pattern, deciding not to frog it as it’s a perfect weight for a spring scarf.

Where Have I Been?

Where Have I Been?

Where Have I Been?

The Princess Boa also included a beading technique of applying the bead (bell) during the knitting instead of adding them all to the yarn before knitting and then sliding them up for the necessary stitch.

Where Have I Been?

I am quite thrilled with all the new possibilities ahead and race home each day after work to try something new.

So much fun!  More reports to  come…

  
March 2015 Reading

March 2015 Reading

My March 2015 Reading report looks like I went a little crazy with the book buying, but Amazon had another one of their Sale Days when a multitude of Paleo e-books were not only on sale, but free! What a deal!

Books Bought March 2015

TitleAuthor
Death in Sicily: The First Three Stories of the Inspector Montalbano SeriesDamon Runyon
The ItaliansJohn Hooper
Paleo Gluten Free Slow Cooker RecipesBeth Gabriel
The Flavor Bible: Paleo Sauce and Dip RecipJ.S. West
10 MInute Paleo Slow Cooker CookbookDerek Doepker
Paleo BreakfastAngelina Dylon
Paleo CookiesAngelina Dylon
The Art of Frugal SimplicityJessica Jacobs
The Paleo Comfort Foods CookbookMartha Drummond
Death at La Fenice: A Commissioner Brunetti MysteryDonna Leon
The Storied Life of A.J. FikryGabrielle Zevin
The Hundred-Year HouseRebecca Makkai
From Wahnsinnig to the Loony Bin: German and Russian StoriesHenry Whittlesey

The sale was also good timing with Passover right around the corner. I find that many Paleo recipes are perfect for Passover since they avoid flour all together. Paleo Cookies has many good recipes, but I haven’t made any yet. (I ended up making Paleo Fudge Bites for Passover, which were delicious!)

I looked through the Paleo Comfort Food book because I made the worst meatloaf ever the other night!  I used almond meal instead of bread crumbs and while I did eat it that night, I could not bring myself to eat the leftovers.  It usually tastes better the next day…not this time! Too bad, how disappointing! I am hoping for a better bread crumb replacement from this book.

Books Read March 2015

TitleAuthorRating
The ItaliansJohn HooperDid not like; Did not finish
Paleo CookiesAngelina DylonWill come back to make the recipes!
The Paleo Comfort Foods CookbookMartha DrummondGood selection.
Death at La FeniceDonna LeonFair to Good
The Hundred-Year HouseRebecca MakkaiStill Reading
What Alice ForgotLiane MoriarityTrite. Could not get into it.
The Girl in the Flammable SkirtAimee BenderDisappointing
Every Day in Tuscany: Seasons of an Italian LifeFrances MayesOkay, did not finish.
All my old knitting magazinesVogue, Interweave, KnitSimple, etc.Great!

My friends and I are planning a trip to Tuscany in the Fall so that led to a renewed interest in Italy-related books.  The Italians was disappointing. The description “John Hooper’s entertaining and perceptive new book is the ideal companion for anyone seeking to understand contemporary Italy and the unique character of the Italians. Digging deep into their history, culture, and religion, Hooper offers keys to understanding everything from their bewildering politics to their love of life and beauty. Looking at the facts that lie behind the stereotypes, he sheds new light on many aspects of Italian life: football and Freemasonry, sex, symbolism, and the reason why Italian has twelve words for a coat hanger, yet none for a hangover,” sounded so engaging, but so far I haven’t made it past the 40th page!  I will try again later.

March 2015 Reading

Death at La Fenice was good even though I guessed the answer around the middle.  This is the first in a series, so I think I will read more and hope they will get harder to solve.

Every Day in Tuscany is the sequel to Under the Tuscan Sun by Frances Mayes. I couldn’t get through the first but decided to try the second book anyway. Same result.  They’re just not that engaging.  A friend and I are going to have wine and watch the movie before we go to Italy. I think the wine will definitely help!

Another friend has asked me to knit her a poncho/ruana so I have been looking through  my magazine and book (and of course online) materials to come up with ideas. This has given me the opportunity to also bookmark other exciting patterns.  Even patterns from magazines that are ten years old (or more) would be so pretty with the luscious yarns available today!

March 2015 Reading

I am two-thirds of the way through The Hundred-Year House by Rebecca Makkai, the author of The Borrowers.  I loved The Borrowers when I was young! I would say that even though I haven’t finished it yet, I liked The Hundred-Year House best of my March selection.  It’s about the inhabitants of a house, and how their stories evolve over the years. It’s told backwards which is kind of annoying, but also makes me think about the story when I’m doing something else. When I get to the end, I wonder if then I’ll have to re-read the beginning?

  
3 Patterns

3 Patterns

I set a goal of “3 Patterns” for the past 6 weeks. It was a bit vague, but I think I really meant it just to spur my creativity and branch out. It could have been read 3 Patterns, write 3 Patterns, knit 3 Patterns, crochet 3 Patterns…just do something with 3 different Patterns!

I met my goal and tried 3 knitting patterns, completed 2, 1 was a success. Smile. I am more about process than results, so I am happy that I did 3 Patterns. Never mind the results!

1. Winter Hat with variegated yarn intarsia pattern.
2. Started the Summit Shawl.
3. Made a very long boa scarf for a 5-year old princesslittle girl..princess.

1. Winter Hat


This is the Neighborhood Fiber DK in Victorian Village and a variegated pink DK that I bought on Etsy from Mothy and The Squid. I also used a gold strand with the Victorian Village outside of the ribbing. What fun colors!

I really need to read other winter hat knitting patterns, because once again, the final product turned out too big…but pretty!

2.  The Summit ShawlMandie Harrington is a genius! She created this beautiful shawl, and as I knit it, I continuously marveled at how brilliant she is to have created this pattern.

summitALT2

I started mine in a fingering yarn, and it was turning out nicely.  However, I decided to use the yarn for something else, so frogged it.  I think that I will use a DK instead of a fingering yarn when I do this pattern again.

Summit Shawl

3. Boa scarf. I was asked by this little princess to make a scarf.

3 Patterns

I used a pink fur yarn, a variegated pink/purple fur yarn, a deep pink strand, and knit in bells at each end!

I think I loved it more than the recipient!  Though she had fun with it too.

 

  

Procrastination Counts

Procrastination Counts

I am a procrastinator.

I like the process of planning things.

I like the process of doing things; I’m not that interested in the finished product.

I like beginnings but not endings.

I think these innate traits make me a natural procrastinator.

Procrastination Counts

However….

Lately, I’ve been wondering how many times do I need to think about doing something before I’ll actually do it.

Like, empty the dishwasher, take the garbage out, move the papers to the recycle bin (ugh, all cleaning activities!).

Procrastination Counts

Before, the count (of how many times do I…) was a solid 5.

Now, it’s about 3.

The other day, it was actually 1!

Crazy.

  
February 2015 Reading

February 2015 Reading

Summary: My February 2015 Reading Results were better than January’s, but not where I want to be.

Bottom line: I really need to get to the gym more often.

I station myself on a treadmill, set my kindle on the book rack, and let the book “take me away” while I walk.

Really, if I have a good book I will go to the gym more often and walk as long as possible. As long as possible = Given that my gym is at work, the more I walk the later I will end up working.

The only time this strategy did not work was when I was reading The Girl on the Train, by Paula Hawkins.  I had high expectations and did not want to get caught up in the story and then have to drag myself away in the middle.

Books Bought February 2015

TitleAuthor
GangsterlandTod Goldberg
Leaving TimeJodi Picoult
The Girl on the TrainPaula Hawkins

I had read about Gangsterland in the NY Times Sunday Book Review, and had recommended it to my Temple Book Club. As with The Grifters, again from the NY Times Book Review and a recommendation to my other book club, I just went ahead and read it on my own, without waiting for the others to join me.

February 2015 Reading

I wouldn’t say that I loved Gangsterland, but I would say that I loved certain parts of it…especially when the Rabbis were portrayed irreverently!  Some of my friends say that they choose a temple based on the rabbi, but I have never liked to give the clergy that much distinction.  I choose based on the community because I feel I would spend more time with the other members than with the clergy. (And between you and me, I rarely pay attention to the sermons because I often feel that they are sanctimonious, and I have no patience for that kind of attitude.)

So a story that has an American-Italian mobster impersonating a Rabbi was highly enjoyable!

February 2015 Reading

TitleAuthorRating
GangsterlandTod GoldbergGood
Leaving TimeJodi PicoultFair
The Girl on the TrainPaula HawkinsGood!!!
The Mighty Queens of Freeville: A Mother, a Daughter, and the Town that Raised ThemAmy DickinsonDid not finish
Sous Chef: 24 Hours on the LineMichael GibneyNot interested
Fall of GiantsKen FollettHave not finished

I wasn’t sure if I should put Fall of Giants on the list yet. A friend has lent me the hardcover, and I also borrowed the e-edition when I went away for a weekend.  But I’ve barely cracked it open, and have only read through the family listings before the story begins. BUT…I have heard rave reviews, and it is on the To Read list, so alas, it is included.

Sous Chef is about how a restaurant kitchen operates over the course of 24 hours.  Turns out I wasn’t as interested as I thought! And I was disappointed in Amy Dickinson’s book, and I hate to say that because I love her on Wait, Wait Don’t Tell Me.

As of February reading, I was biding my time to sink my teeth into The Girl on the Train.  It is now March when I’ve finished it, so I will be quite proper (Downton Abbey-speak!) and wait till next month’s post to give you my review. (Sneak Peek: if you are thinking about reading it, do so!)

February 2015 Reading

Since I have so few books on my list this month, I would have to say that the one I recommend most is Gangsterland.  It has interesting perspectives on modern mobsters, religion, and relationships.

 

  

Whole 30 Results

Well, I made it through the Whole 30!  It was easy in the beginning and then the middle dragged on, and then it was over!  I know you’re wondering about the whole 30 results. I have to tell you that I am feeling way better than the  numbers reflect.  I’m actually a little disappointed with the numbers even though I keep telling myself that this was only 30 days!

The Numbers

  • Lost 7.6 pounds
  • Lost 2 inches in the bust (& in a bra hook)
  • Lost 1.5 inches in the waist
  • Lost 1.5 inches in the hips
  • I did not measure my thighs but my pant legs are looser too.

The Health Aspects

  • Sleeping better – what does this mean? I fall asleep pretty quickly but that is nothing new. I sleep through the night.  That’s not really new.  I sleep down and out, a good solid sleep.  That’s new.
  • I feel the need to move around.  This is very new. I have always been very happy being sedentary. Now I feel restless if I have a more stationary day. These Work From Home Snow Days have proven this, unfortunately (because of the multiple snow days) again and again.
  • BOREDOM. Well, this is a negative way of reflecting upon the lack of indecision or distraction.  When I used to have spare time, I would get so excited and overwhelmed with the choices.  Now, or in the last 30 days, I am very calm and focused.  One thing at a time, all in order and still time to spare.  So much time!  To spare!
  • FOCUS. This is a partner to the above paragraph.  Clear thinking. Focused. Get things done quickly.  BORED.  But calm.
  • Thirsty.  I think giving up any in-between meal noshing has made me realize that I might have had a snack before instead of a drink.  I am not a big water drinker, but now I actually drink seltzer or water instead of eating.
  • Cravings. None.
  • My skin is brighter.  It’s hard to describe because I didn’t take notes on this facet beforehand, but I can tell you that my skin looks healthier than I think it looked before.
  • Energy Level. Up.  (Repeat of 3rd bullet point?)
  • More decisive. (Repeat of 4th bullet point?)  I’ve cut the cord of a certain online dating site that has not been successful, speak more of my mind (hard for some of my friends to imagine!), and don’t put up with as much BS as before.
  • My fingernails are stronger. (I still bite my nails, but noticed that I do it after I eat too much fruit! I always knew that I bit my nails after eating unbalanced or unhealthy food.)
  • My stomach is not bloated. I knew before that gluten products made me bloated, but now it appears that other foods have the same effect…foods that I cut out during this whole 30 day period.

Other

  • Food is boring now. Sure, there was the exciting lemon curry cauliflower recipe (pictured below) in the beginning, and I know there are other good recipes out there, but I am bored.  When I was writing this I could hardly remember what I had for dinner (grilled shrimp with mild kimchi and red peppers, with an orange and sunflower seeds for dessert, and water).  Not very memorable and I like being excited about food.

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  • I also found that I enjoyed being super picky and having food the way I wanted it in a restaurant. I’m usually resigned to having outside food served a way I don’t like or with ingredients that I avoid at home. Doing the Whole 30 allowed me to be really specific without apology.  Even choosing to not have the gravy because it has flour in it made me feel good.
  • I hosted my Book Club and served cookies, cheesy popcorn and chocolates (Hershey’s miniatures and Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups) and dried apricots.  I was not tempted and threw out the cookie and popcorn leftovers right away. Believe it or not, the chocolates are still sitting on my coffee table and are not even vaguely interesting.
  • I seem to have a reaction to too much ghee or maybe it’s just rich foods? I ended up with a stomachache after adding too much ghee to the pan to cook my eggs, or on top of some veggies.  I always knew that I was somewhat lactose-intolerant, but this really surprised me because ghee doesn’t have lactose.  Luckily the next step of this diet allows me to pinpoint how different foods affect me.

 What’s Next?

Now is the Reintroduction period where one slowly incorporates previously restricted foods. It’s recommended that one food group is done at a time, over a period of 3-4 days, so that any reactions can be detected and traced to the particular food.

I thought I’d start with sweets, but don’t have a plan yet.  I’m going to stick to most of the Whole 30 for a little while longer.  The best advice about finishing is this –

So what should you do?

  1. Continue eating Whole30-ish every meal, every day, as long as that feels good to you. (We say “Whole30-ish” because added sugar may creep back in, like ketchup with your burger. That seems reasonable to us. If ketchup is the worst thing in your diet, you’re doing okay.)
  2. When something comes around that is too good to pass up—too special, too sentimental, to important culturally, or simply too darn delicious—make a conscious, deliberate choice as to whether or not you are going to indulge.
  3. If you choose to indulge, take your time. Savor it. Eat consciously. And eat only as little as you need to satisfy the situation, your experience, or your taste buds. Maybe that’s a bite, maybe it’s the whole cookie, maybe it’s 6 cookies—just make sure you don’t fall into automatic consumption.
  4. When you’re done, move the heck on. No guilt, no shame, no remorse. You made a conscious decision to eat something you deemed worth it. Good for you. Now let’s move on back to our normally scheduled healthy meals.

You may find that you indulge once every few weeks, because nothing really amazing comes up in between. Or you may find that you indulge every day for 12 days, like on a vacation in Europe. Both are okay, as long as you are following this protocol. Conscious, deliberate decisions. Honest evaluations of “worth it.” And then a return to your normal healthy habits, no beating yourself up.

  

January 2015 Reading

I’m late to report on my January 2015 Reading!  That’s because there wasn’t much reading going on. I was trying to remember what I did instead of reading, and all I could think of was knitting the Iodine Cowl.

A friend recommended that I listen to books instead of reading, so I can knit and read at the same time, but I just really prefer to read than be read to…unless I’m in the car (driving or not!).

January 2015 Books Purchased

This would have been zero, except that a book that I back-ordered arrived this month:

200 Fair Isle Motifs, Mary Jane Mucklestone

January 2015 Reading

Well, if I had to buy a book in January, this was a great one!  Each pattern is shown in at least two color diagram choices (like cross-stitch) and then with a chart to follow. There is always a knitted sample of one of the designs at the top of the page.

January 2015 Reading

I already have a project in mind that will use at least two of the designs, which I hope to share the end results with you soon…

January 2015 Reading

Again, a small list.

First, I have to say that I don’t see the appeal of Mary Kay Andrews’ writing.  After two chapters, I couldn’t bear to waste my time anymore and returned it to the library ASAP.

I have no idea why I wanted to read The One and Only, but it had been on my Read From The Library list for awhile.  It’s about a young woman who likes sports, and her best friend’s family, where the father happens to be a college football coach. There’s obviously a lot of sports talk, which is not that enlightening to me, but the relationships are pretty believable, which is why I made it to the end of the book.

The Betrayers and Leaving Time were the selections for my two book clubs.  I read through each of them, not really engaged in either.  The Betrayers, at a high level, is about an Israeli political persona who basically runs away with a (younger) mistress to a Russian seaside town where he and his family visited when he was a child. After our book club discussion, I had a little more insight into what could make this book more interesting – the history of Jews in Russia, the Russian equivalent of the McArthur era, and even some insight into Israel.

Leaving Time was my first experience reading Jodi Picoult’s writing.  Interestingly enough, it was about elephant relationships and human relationships, and sometimes a elephant-human relationships.  I say “Interestingly enough,” because I have always been fascinated by elephants, and also have donated money to the Elephant Sanctuary in Tennessee which was the basis for much of the book.  I was not captivated while reading the book, and had to push myself through certain parts.  However, by the end and when it was over, it gave enough to leaf back through it, looking for hints of what I missed to bring it to its conclusion (which I now understand is typical of her stories).

I would have to say that thanks to my book club discussion, The Betrayers was the most interesting book I read this month.  I’m sure if I had been more prolific, my choice would be different.

January 2015 Reading

 

 

  

Offensive Celebrities

I never really thought that Jerry Seinfeld would fall into the offensive celebrities category, but unfortunately he has now entered that world.

When a celebrity does something offensive, there is the risk of making him/her more popular by pointing a finger at it.  Publicizing the work makes the view count rate go up, thus perhaps making the celebrity’s work more profitable.

However, the backlash toward Brian Williams’ helicopter confession has made me stronger to publicly take a stand.

I have enjoyed the first 2 or 3 seasons of Jerry Seinfeld’s Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee web series. I recently watched the episode with Jon Stewart, and felt very uneasy about their casual conversation about concentration camps  (at the 7:40 mark).  The remarks and their own laughing were about the title “concentration camps” and whether or not this wording is accurate.  I find this conversation and their own subsequent self-amusement to be in extremely bad taste, and I certainly would never accept the reasoning that it’s okay because they are Jewish.  I would say because they are Jewish, that makes it even worse.

Offensive Celebrities
http://comediansincarsgettingcoffee.com/jon-stewart-the-sound-of-virginity

Jerry Seinfeld and Jon Stewart are solid pillars of the Comedic Industry.  They’ve expanded their outreach beyond my generation to my children who also enjoy their work. They are reaching a wide audience.  They should know better than to joke about this.  They have crossed the line, and I hope that the younger generation also feels that this is not right.

I don’t feel that I am usually a high-and-mighty or holier than thou kind of person. I prefer to think that while others may do things that I don’t agree with, as long as it’s not hurting anyone, I can just leave them alone and go my own way.

Regardless, I must stand up against this 2 minute conversation. It should have been edited out.