Knit Wit Living

Reflections, Beading, Knitting, Life

Archive for the tag “frogging”

Where Have I Been?

I feel like it’s been ages since I posted, and even I’m wondering Where Have I Been?!

Where Have I Been?

Well, I’ve succumbed to the Beading Bug, and am trying the art of beading in order to create some new knitting.  I have bought / read a slew of beading materials and have been learning basic beading as a means to enhance my knitting.  I want to go beyond what’s out there and my mind is swirling with possibilities to test.

I’m only posting a few pictures today to show you my first trial of knitting with beads that I learned in my class at VKL this past January.

I had bought this sparkly yarn from Holiday Yarns at the VKL Marketplace and have knitted and ripped and tried different patterns out. I bought some beads and completed a (self-designed) pattern, deciding not to frog it as it’s a perfect weight for a spring scarf.

Where Have I Been?

Where Have I Been?

Where Have I Been?

The Princess Boa also included a beading technique of applying the bead (bell) during the knitting instead of adding them all to the yarn before knitting and then sliding them up for the necessary stitch.

Where Have I Been?

I am quite thrilled with all the new possibilities ahead and race home each day after work to try something new.

So much fun!  More reports to  come…

3 Patterns

I set a goal of “3 Patterns” for the past 6 weeks. It was a bit vague, but I think I really meant it just to spur my creativity and branch out. It could have been read 3 Patterns, write 3 Patterns, knit 3 Patterns, crochet 3 Patterns…just do something with 3 different Patterns!

I met my goal and tried 3 knitting patterns, completed 2, 1 was a success. Smile. I am more about process than results, so I am happy that I did 3 Patterns. Never mind the results!

1. Winter Hat with variegated yarn intarsia pattern.
2. Started the Summit Shawl.
3. Made a very long boa scarf for a 5-year old princesslittle girl..princess.

1. Winter Hat

This is the Neighborhood Fiber DK in Victorian Village and a variegated pink DK that I bought on Etsy from Mothy and The Squid. I also used a gold strand with the Victorian Village outside of the ribbing. What fun colors!

I really need to read other winter hat knitting patterns, because once again, the final product turned out too big…but pretty!

2.  The Summit ShawlMandie Harrington is a genius! She created this beautiful shawl, and as I knit it, I continuously marveled at how brilliant she is to have created this pattern.


I started mine in a fingering yarn, and it was turning out nicely.  However, I decided to use the yarn for something else, so frogged it.  I think that I will use a DK instead of a fingering yarn when I do this pattern again.

Summit Shawl

3. Boa scarf. I was asked by this little princess to make a scarf.

3 Patterns

I used a pink fur yarn, a variegated pink/purple fur yarn, a deep pink strand, and knit in bells at each end!

I think I loved it more than the recipient!  Though she had fun with it too.


Frogging is an Aerobic Exercise!

In a previous post, I said I would keep you up to date on my progress using the lovely DK yarn I purchased on Etsy from Shunklies.


I have frogged it twice already!

I really want it to be a very long scarf that shows off the wonderful colors.

First I tried Tunisian crochet, but…

  • The colors were too close together and
  • I wasn’t having much fun with the technique,
    • So I frogged it.

Then I tried knitting it. I used No. 10 needles so that the yarn would really shine through and the stitches wouldn’t be too tight. After about 5 inches, I listened to the nagging in my head and Stopped the Project.

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  • I wasn’t sure how long it was going to be
    • Even though I had cast on over 300 stitches
  • I didn’t like the pattern I was making up as I was going along
    • Stockinette a bunch of rows
    • Reverse Stockinette a bunch of rows
    • K3, P3 a bunch of rows
    • P3, K3 a bunch of rows
    • (And then I would have repeated the first two sections)
  • The knitting and ribbing didn’t show off the color variations very well
    • The colors were too close together and
    • They appeared as a cacophony of colors instead of being able to appreciate each color set

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When I pulled it off the needles, I saw that it was actually very long – 139 inches to be exact!

Cool! Would it be worth it to finish it off there or (gasp!) put the 300+ stitches back on the needle and carry on?


Continue with the new plan to Start Over.

So I ripped out at least 5” worth of 300+ stitches.

Who says Frogging isn’t good for you?

My Fitbit captured it as over 900 steps!

Frogging is an aerobic exercise

Now I am on to crocheting in my usual Crocheted Scarf pattern. I think it looks good. It gives each color pattern its own place to shine. Keep your fingers crossed that this pattern is the one. I’ll keep you posted.

After Frogging

Tunisian Crochet

Tunisian Crochet is described as “the knitter’s crochet.”  All the stitches get loaded up on the hook for a row and then are crocheted off.

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It creates a densely woven fabric that was originally only used for pillows and upholstery, but is now also used in clothing patterns.

I practiced the basic stitches described in the Tunisian Crochet book (“the book of knitting with the ease of crocheting”) I purchased from Knit Picks (True Confession 1: I received the Vogue Knitting book and pattern sale email, compared the selection to the Knit Picks 40% off sale and ended up buying the book and a set of hooks from Knit Picks.)

After knitting, err I mean crocheting, about 6 inches, I stopped and assessed my progress.

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Pretty.  Interesting. Pretty interesting.

True Confession 2: Not fully satisfied with the piece of fabric.  Well, that’s not entirely true.  I do like it, I just don’t think I’ll ever do anything with it even if I finish it to become a scarf.

Frogged it!

Frogged it!

I’m thinking it might be fun to take a really thin yarn and Tunisian crochet it so that the stitches are loosely woven.

In the meantime, I like knitting the best.  It allows more flexibility with the shape of the created fabric, the stitches can be tight or loose, lacy or not, all in one single pattern.  I think there’s a lot more room for creativity with knitting.

Back to the work in progress…The next time I post a picture of this scarf, it will be done.  (True Confession 3: I hope!)

More than halfway through!

More than halfway through!

Oh, Dear!

I did the unthinkable! I frogged the Craftsy KAL Cowl, a knitted cable pattern.

Not that frogging is unthinkable and certainly not inexcusable.

The major twist is that I am now using the yarn to crochet (yet another) scarf. Yes, I Ripped Out Knitting to crochet!

I also frogged the last piece I was crocheting,

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but now feel somewhat comfortable enough to experiment creating crochet stitch sets on my own.  I know that won’t help me when I try to follow a crochet pattern, but it will give me an idea of how the stitches balance and counterbalance each other.

On another note…I’ve been corresponding with some Italians this week to find an apartment while visiting LD during her study abroad later this year.  They use the salutation, “Dear,” which I am quite enjoying and have been replying in the same manner.

It reminds me of my grandmother, who used to write (actually type, on her Selectric typewriter), “Julie Dear,” instead of “Dear Julie.” I always liked that term of endearment!

I miss the more formal days of writing letters with “Dear;” emails can never convey that personal touch.

And this grandmother was the one who I ever first saw knitting; I still have some of her afghans (though I accidentally felted one recently).  I’m betting she wouldn’t mind. “Oh, Dear…”

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